Author: Laura

Writers: How do you create characters?

Writers: How do you create characters?

Characters can without a doubt, make or break a piece of fiction: they are the beating heart of a story. I know from my own experience as a reader that it doesn’t matter how good a concept the story has, or how well plotted it is, if the characters are flat and lifeless. Readers need to care about characters and feel invested in them in order to engage with the story, which is why creating characters can be such a difficult part of writing.

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Review: Trinity by Conn Iggulden

Review: Trinity by Conn Iggulden

‘’You are my king,’ York said softly. ‘I ask only to stand at your side. You need good counsel, cousin. You need me.’ Quite a while ago, I read the first book in Conn Iggulden’s War of the Roses series and loved it. Whilst I have read loads of novels about the Tudor period, the War of the Roses is an area of history I know less about, and the story of Henry VI and how the strife between the houses of York and Lancaster began was fascinating. And things got even more interesting in Trinity, with more battles, more… Read more »

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How do you choose books?

How do you choose books?

Until recently, I’ve never thought too much about how I choose my next read – it just seems like such a natural process. By this point in my reading life, I’ve a pretty good idea of what sort of thing I’ll like and usually go off instinct (not that this is foolproof!), although I’ve noticed there are a few things that tend to guide my decision:

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The Seven Deadly Sins of Reading

The Seven Deadly Sins of Reading

As a general rule, us readers are a pretty well behaved lot – after all, we’d really much rather be reading! But there are a few sins that bookworms are apt to commit, and so I thought I’d do a little post about the ‘Seven Deadly Sins of Reading’. I didn’t realise when I started writing this that there’s actually a tag kind of like this, but I’m doing it a little differently!

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Review: Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas

Review: Heir of Fire by Sarah J. Maas

‘She was the heir of ash and fire, and she would bow to no one.’ Warning: Minor spoilers. There are seriously, no words for how much I loved this book. THERE ARE NO WORDS! I’m going to try and write a coherent review anyway though, so here goes… Heir of Fire kicks off where Crown of Midnight ended: Celaena is in Wendlyn under the pretence of fulfilling her latest mission for the King of Adarlan. However, her true mission is to find the Fae Queen Maeve and find out how to destroy the Wyrdkeys and defeat the King and his… Read more »

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Five Reasons To Love Reading

Five Reasons To Love Reading

Is it just me who really can’t fathom people who don’t like reading? I get that everyone’s different (and some people probably can’t understand why I love reading so much!) but what do non-readers do with their time? And don’t tell me it’s all important real life stuff like house work and paying bills because I do all that too…but I also read.

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Writers: Where do you get inspiration?

Writers: Where do you get inspiration?

Inspiration is by nature elusive and hard to come by, yet it can make a huge difference to your writing productivity. Any writer knows that it is 100 times easier to sit down and write when your head is buzzing with ideas that you just have to get down, than when your mind is blank and resembles a tumbleweed-strewn desert. But where can you find it? Where does inspiration come from and how can you harness it? These are a few ways I get ideas or get inspired, and I’d be interested to know where other writers and bloggers get… Read more »

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Review: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson

Review: The Final Empire by Brandon Sanderson

‘Ash fell from the sky. Vin watched the downy flakes drift through the air. Leisurely. Careless. Free. The puffs of soot fell like black snowflakes, descending upon the dark city of Luthadel.’ The Final Empire is set in a fantasy world with a twist: the Dark Lord has already won. The immortal Lord Ruler has ruled over The Final Empire – a dark, dystopian world of falling ash and mist – for 1000 years, as both a God and an evil tyrant. But now a new uprising is gathering, led by a charismatic criminal mastermind and aided by an uncommonly… Read more »

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My Own ‘Manifesto On How To Be Interesting’

My Own ‘Manifesto On How To Be Interesting’

Recently I read a book by Holly Bourne called The Manifesto on How To Be Interesting, which was actually pretty good (I’d give it 3 or 4 out of 5). Whilst I don’t feel I have enough to say about it to write up an entire review, I thought it would be pretty cool to write my own ‘Manifesto On How To Be Interesting.’ And on that note, I should start this post with a bit of an admission – most of my real life acquaintances think I’m really boring (which is why it’s pretty ironic that I’m writing a… Read more »

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My Top Ten Classic Novels

My Top Ten Classic Novels

10. Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen Whilst Jane Austen’s most popular book tends to be Pride and Prejudice, Northanger Abbey remains my favourite. Despite its largely unlikable characters, this mock Gothic tale is one that is still funny today, and is a great example of Austen’s classic wit and satire.

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