Tag: writing discussion

Things I Love About Writing

Things I Love About Writing

Sometimes writing is an absolute joy, but at other times, it’s incredibly stressful. Seen as we’re currently in the midst of NaNoWriMo I’m going to wager that a lot of writers are currently feeling the latter…I know I am! I’d been keeping up with NaNo pretty well until yesterday when I had one of those days where I just really, really didn’t want to write. This happens occasionally, and shouldn’t be a big deal, but I’m already stressing about being behind, which is sapping my will to write even more. So I thought I’d do a little post reminding myself… Read more »

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Do you have a writing ritual?

Do you have a writing ritual?

I used to be a pretty chilled writer. I would literally write wherever, whether it was curled up on the couch whilst precariously balancing my laptop on my knee, sat in bed with the duvet pulled up to my chest, or at a table in the library at university. I’d have other students bustling by me or chatting at the next table, or at home I’d have my flatmate watching Big Brother or Love Island in the background (and noisy reality shows don’t make for great concentration!). I got some writing done, but I definitely wasn’t getting the maximum amount… Read more »

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How To Write Great Dialogue

How To Write Great Dialogue

One of the biggest, and most important aspects of any novel is the dialogue. I mean, can you imagine a book without it? It would be unspeakably boring (if you’ll pardon the pun!)! For one thing, dialogue is the primary way in which you show your character’s personality, as the way someone talks and how they interact with the world is very telling in regards to who they are as a person. It’s also integral to them building relationships with other characters, and can help move the story along. However, writing dialogue isn’t something that comes naturally to everyone, and… Read more »

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What makes a good plot twist?

What makes a good plot twist?

For me, a plot twist can really make or break a story: if it’s skilfully done, it can leave you reeling, and questioning everything that came before, but if not…well it can leave you feeling cheated and annoyed. But what separates the amazing ‘oh my god, how did I not see that coming?!’ twists from the ones that just fall flat? Well here’s a few of my thoughts on what makes a good plot twist: It mustn’t be predictable… The key to a great plot twist is that it shouldn’t be predictable. I mean, that’s the whole point of a twist,… Read more »

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When do you get to call yourself a writer?

When do you get to call yourself a writer?

I’ve been writing since I was very young: I’ve always been enamoured with stories and it wasn’t a huge jump to go from reading and enjoying other people’s to creating my own. I discovered my love of writing stories in a English class at school, and I was soon spending my spare time at home filling up notepad after notepad with my scrawlings. As I progressed through my teenage years and into adulthood I continued writing (often using it as a form of therapy to get through bullying and the awkwardness of being a teenager), and I even went on… Read more »

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3 Ways To Improve Your Writing

3 Ways To Improve Your Writing

We’ve all heard the phrase ‘practice makes perfect’, and whilst perfection itself may not be achievable, I think we can all agree with the sentiment. It’s simply logical that the more you do something, the better you get at it, and that definitely applies to writing. There really isn’t any way around putting in those hours at the keyboard (or with your pen in hand): with every story or novel chapter you write you will be growing and improving as a writer. However, I’ve found in my own writing that there are certain things you can do that make for… Read more »

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How do you know if your story idea is a keeper?

How do you know if your story idea is a keeper?

As writers, we’re constantly coming up with fresh story ideas, and inevitably some of them will be absolute gold, whilst others…well others won’t be! I, for one, have definitely cringed at some of my ideas when looking back through old notebooks and my Evernote folders, and thought ‘what the hell was I thinking?!’. But at the time it must have seemed like a good idea, because why else would I have written it down? So how do you tell the difference between a good idea that you should definitely follow up (or ‘a keeper’, as I think of it) and… Read more »

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Writers: What scenes do you like writing best?

Writers: What scenes do you like writing best?

Do other writers find that there are certain types of scenes that they absolutely love writing, whilst others feel like a bit of a drag? Because that’s something I’ve noticed about my writing process recently: my writing tends to massively slow down around certain points of the story, and then speed up when I get to the sections I consider to be ‘the good bits’. Now in an ideal world I’d consider the entirety of my writing projects to be ‘good bits’, and my fingers would effortlessly dance across the keyboard whatever scene I’m writing… Unfortunately though I think it’s just a… Read more »

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5 Great Podcasts For Writers

5 Great Podcasts For Writers

What’s not to love about podcasts? They’re free, portable, and are a great way of getting a dose of inspiration and entertainment into your day, all whilst doing something ordinary and necessary, like driving to work, or exercising, or walking the dog. You can find podcasts on pretty much any topic, but my personal favourites all tend to revolve around the craft of writing, and I can definitely vouch for the fact that they’re an incredible resource for any budding writer! Therefore I thought I’d post a list of my five favourites, some of which I’ve undoubtedly mentioned many times before, and others… Read more »

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#writerproblems

#writerproblems

You simultaneously think you’re an undiscovered literary genius and the worst writer to ever hold a pen. You’re in the midst of a great writing session and your fingers are flying across the keyboard, and you’re thinking to yourself ‘this is pure gold!’ Then you read it back, and your self-esteem and entire self worth as a writer plummets past your feet. Awesome. People keep asking you what your book is about. Do you want the long version or the short version? The short version? Oh, sorry, there isn’t one. Your best ideas occur to you in places where you… Read more »

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