Category: Reviews

Review: Ravenspur by Conn Iggulden

Review: Ravenspur by Conn Iggulden

‘He summoned his will to be cruel, to tell Edward they had no choice but to run, that they were in the wrong place, in the wrong season and that Warwick had already won… ‘Very well, Edward. I will ride with you, one more time.” It’s definitely a sign of a great series when you read the last book and are genuinely gutted that it’s over, and that’s how I felt when I finished Conn Iggulden’s Ravenspur. I didn’t actually realise it was the last book in the series until half way through… Read more »

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Review: Son of the Shadows by Juliet Marillier

Review: Son of the Shadows by Juliet Marillier

‘“Don’t you long for something different to happen, something so exciting and new it carries you along with it like a great tide, something that lets your life blaze and burn so the whole world can see it?”’ Anyone whose a regular visitor to my blog has probably heard me go on about Juliet Marillier’s Daughter of the Forest: it was easily the best book I read last year, and definitely one of my all-time best reads (high praise indeed!). So I’ve no idea why I’ve waited this long to read the next… Read more »

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Review: Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon

Review: Dragonfly in Amber by Diana Gabaldon

‘I stood still, vision blurring, and in that moment, I heard my heart break. It was a small, clean sound, like the snapping of a flower’s stem.’ A while ago I read the first book in Diana Gabaldon’s famous Outlander series, and whilst I enjoyed it, I found it problematic in a several ways. However, I feel like these issues were less prominent in this second instalment, and I actually found myself enjoying Dragonfly in Amber much more than Outlander. Dragonfly in Amber opens with Claire Randall having returned to the 20th Century, where she has been living for… Read more »

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Review: The Brontë Cabinet by Deborah Lutz

Review: The Brontë Cabinet by Deborah Lutz

“There are few books I’d rather carry me late into the night than Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights and Villette, few books whose worlds I’d rather crawl into and inhabit. I have even felt, somehow, known by their heroines, as if they might recognise me when I enter their spheres.” I don’t seem to read non-fiction books all that often these days, but Deborah Lutz’s The Brontë Cabinet: Three Live in Nine Objects is one book I’ve been pretty excited to get to for a long time. I’ve been a huge fan of the Brontë sisters’ work for years, and have been… Read more »

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Review: The Queen’s Choice by Anne O’Brien

Review: The Queen’s Choice by Anne O’Brien

‘The King might be praying for me but it was three years and more since I had last seen him. Three years and more since I had been married and widowed. Three years during which I had rejected the possibility of this union. Yet now I stood on the threshold of a new life.’ As an avid fan of historical fiction, I was really pleased to discover a new historical fiction writer last year: Anne O’Brien. I read two of her books, The King’s Concubine and The Forbidden Queen, and really enjoyed them…. Read more »

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Mini Reviews: Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

Mini Reviews: Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom by Leigh Bardugo

I’ve been meaning to review these books for simply ages, but have been struggling to decide how to put into words my absolute adoration of this duology…so prepare for some serious gushing! It actually took me a long time to get round to reading Six of Crows and Crooked Kingdom, even though they’ve been on my book radar for some time. I think a large part of the delay was my fear of the hype – a few well hyped series I’ve read haven’t lived up to my expectations (ahem, The Raven Boys, I’m looking at you!), and… Read more »

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Mini Reviews: The Boleyn Deceit and The Boleyn Reckoning by Laura Andersen

Mini Reviews: The Boleyn Deceit and The Boleyn Reckoning by Laura Andersen

I’ve been meaning to write reviews for these two books for so long that I’ve decided to just condense them into some little mini-reviews, so here goes! The Boleyn Deceit and The Boleyn Reckoning are the second and third books in Laura Andersen’s alternate history trilogy about what would have happened if Anne Boleyn had had a surviving son. I read the first book The Boleyn King a while back and enjoyed it, but didn’t find it to be particularly memorable, so to my surprise I absolutely loved the second and third instalments!… Read more »

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Review: The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater

Review: The Dream Thieves by Maggie Stiefvater

“While I’m gone,” Gansey said, pausing, “dream me the world. Something new for every night.” Warning: Minor spoilers. A while back I read the first book in Maggie Stiefvater’s popular Raven Cycle, The Raven Boys, and was disappointed to find it didn’t quite live up to the hype for me. It’s such a well-loved series in the book blogging world, that I’d hoped to be blown away, but instead found it to simply be OK. However, I decided to give the series a proper go by reading the second book, to see… Read more »

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Review: Before They Are Hanged by Joe Abercrombie

Review: Before They Are Hanged by Joe Abercrombie

‘“Strange, isn’t it,’ mused Glokta as he watched him struggle for air. ‘Big men, small men, thin men, fat men, clever men, stupid men, they all respond the same to a fist in the guts. One minute you think you’re the most powerful man in the world. The next you can’t even breathe by yourself.”’ It’a been some time since I read the first book in Joe Abercrombie’s First Law trilogy, The Blade Itself, and I can remember enjoying the book, but not being 100% blown away. However now that I’ve finally got round… Read more »

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Review: Second Life by S.J. Watson

Review: Second Life by S.J. Watson

‘We’re constantly changing facts, rewriting history to make things easier, to make them fit in with our preferred version of events. We do it automatically. We invent memories. Without thinking. If we tell ourselves something happened often enough we start to believe it, and then we can actually remember it.’ As a general rule, I don’t consider myself to be much of a crime or thriller fan, but seen as I enjoyed the last two I read so much (The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins and Before I Go To… Read more »

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